Paula's Honiton Cowis a good illustration of how one can design a piece of lace without possessing drawing skills. I don't know if Paula does or doesn't have drawing skills, but I know that I don't. Kudos to Paula for realizing that a coloring book is just another word for "lace pattern book". I have lately been reading about the Honiton Lace industry in the 19th century. The lacemakers said that when they needed a new pattern they would take a piece of wall paper with a pleasing design and prick it and put it on a pillow. Of course, William Morris was designing wall paper and home furnishings then, so I find myself wondering if some of the Honiton patterns may actually have been designed by William Morris, but without his knowledge.

Is there anyone else who has tricks for designing without being able to draw?

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I cut out shapes and then trace them for the outline of the area.

Then I fill the shape with a lace pattern. This is how I "design" lace.

Here is my bat.  The lace leaves for my necklace was done the same way.

Do you mean imitating a child?  That is a great octopus!



Carolina de la Guardia said:

The draw has a sense of moving which helps to define how to use the lace technique. You have got a very good result.

It is a surprising such a good draw for a child of seven ! I like it!

Devon Thein said:

Has anyone else dealt with the dilemna of how to design without being able to draw by intimidating a child? My daughter could draw better than I could by the time she was seven years old. One day we watched a nature special about the Octopus and his amazing color changes and I felt inspired to want to capture this in lace. I used my influence over my daughter to get her to draw the Octopus for me. Here was the result. Note that unlike the art of adult artists who try to draw like children, for instance, Miro, this work has a much more genuinely childlike aspect.

Great Bat. What is it about animals in lace that has such appeal?



Julia Brock said:

I cut out shapes and then trace them for the outline of the area.

Then I fill the shape with a lace pattern. This is how I "design" lace.

Here is my bat.  The lace leaves for my necklace was done the same way.

Unlike the artist Miro, I actually used a real child as a designer. My daughter drew this octopus when still quite young, at my request, so that I could make a lace octopus. I don't draw well, but she was and is, quite talented. I don't know where she got this talent. Certainly not from me.

 



Julia Brock said:

Do you mean imitating a child?  That is a great octopus!



Carolina de la Guardia said:

The draw has a sense of moving which helps to define how to use the lace technique. You have got a very good result.

It is a surprising such a good draw for a child of seven ! I like it!

Devon Thein said:

Has anyone else dealt with the dilemna of how to design without being able to draw by intimidating a child? My daughter could draw better than I could by the time she was seven years old. One day we watched a nature special about the Octopus and his amazing color changes and I felt inspired to want to capture this in lace. I used my influence over my daughter to get her to draw the Octopus for me. Here was the result. Note that unlike the art of adult artists who try to draw like children, for instance, Miro, this work has a much more genuinely childlike aspect.

I can't draw but I can cut paper, so I cut out shapes until I find the ones I think will work. Then I fill it with lace grounds and patterns to make the piece.

I also like to take edgings and duplicate them, flip them and reattach to make bookmarks, frames and other shapes.

Hello, I'm new here and I need help with Torchon Lace pricking... I'm not familiar with Torchon lace at all. I'm a Vologda lacer. I have a picture, I found on internet, picture of a lace tree, but it doesn't have pricking or it doesn't give link to tutorial of some sort...

I have seen that photo several times on the internet, but I don't know who the designer was, or what book it is in. It just contains the crescent motif on the edge, a 12 legged spider and some ground

The headside is a variation of the French fan       http://gwydir.demon.co.uk/jo/lace/headside.htm 

grounds        http://gwydir.demon.co.uk/jo/lace/grounds.htm 

spiders        http://gwydir.demon.co.uk/jo/lace/spider.htm

jThen it is a matter of putting those elements together.

Here is the simplified pattern

Lorelei

That tree reminds me of one designed by Lenka Suchanek. http://lenkas.com  I don't see it on her website but maybe because it is not as complicated as her art pieces. I think she designed it for a class.



Gul'naz Taylor said:

Hello, I'm new here and I need help with Torchon Lace pricking... I'm not familiar with Torchon lace at all. I'm a Vologda lacer. I have a picture, I found on internet, picture of a lace tree,https://www.google.com/search?q=old+tree+bobbin+lace&sa=X&b...
  but it doesn't have pricking or it doesn't give link to tutorial of some sort... 

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