Hi again,kids!

Am in love with my new book, "The Grammar of Point Ground." But, uh, what the heck's a Magic Thread?

Views: 1426

Replies to This Discussion

You take a thread, let's say about 8 inches long and knot it so it forms a loop. This is the magic thread. When you start, let us say, with several pairs hung rainbow fashion, around a pin and it is going to be a very tight area to do a sewing later, you put one end of your thread loop, the knotted end, on a helping pin a few inches away from the start pin and make sure the other end goes through the center of the  pairs you are starting. that end, too, is put on the helping pin that the other end of that thread loop is on. This is in no way attached to the actual lace, but just a knotted loop that goes through the start where the pin is.

So, you work the pairs you have hung on the starting pin as though there is no magic thread there. When you are ready to finish and you return to the beginning and need to hook into the infinitessimally small hole that is the center of where the pairs started, you remove the smooth end of the loop from the helping pin and you put one of the bobbins though it. Then you can use the loop to pull the bobbin thread through the start, sort of the way you would with a Lazy Susan. In this case, once the bobbin thread has looped throught the start and you pass the other bobbin of the pair through it, you can cut the magic thread because it has served its purpose.

I am not sure I have made this clear...sigh. It would make a great Youtube, wouldn't it?

Magic threads are separate doubled pieces of thread (often coloured sewing cottons)  that are threaded through the first row of stitches, - where you hang on to a pin at tthe very start.

When you come to the end of the lace, and have to join up, as in a Hankie edge or doily) you can use the magic thread at each pin hole, and pull the end thread through the beginning loop and knot off. It is easier than trying to use a crochet hook, sometimes.

 

I was going to answer.....something I've tried but never mastered....lol
I haven't heard of "The Grammer of Point Ground." who wrote it?
And "magic threads" really are magic! They save a lot of frustration.

I first encountered the magic thread idea in a Bruges bloomwork workshop.

Oh thanks Devon, that makes complete sense. I get it!

Janet, The "Grammar" book is by Ulrike Voelcker, I got it from Van Sciver. It's got a lot of point ground info in the front chapters, and the exercises in the back are in my opinion really nice designs to learn with. I love the book! Worth the $$!

I love Ulrike's books. They are so good for technique. We are very fortunate to have her as a contributer to the Bulletin of the International Old Lacers, Inc.

Devon

Joan Williams Near said:

Oh thanks Devon, that makes complete sense. I get it!

Janet, The "Grammar" book is by Ulrike Voelcker, I got it from Van Sciver. It's got a lot of point ground info in the front chapters, and the exercises in the back are in my opinion really nice designs to learn with. I love the book! Worth the $$!

Thanks for the info. I actually have the book but the title didn't ring a bell. Another senior moment, I guess.
Joan Williams Near said:

Oh thanks Devon, that makes complete sense. I get it!

Janet, The "Grammar" book is by Ulrike Voelcker, I got it from Van Sciver. It's got a lot of point ground info in the front chapters, and the exercises in the back are in my opinion really nice designs to learn with. I love the book! Worth the $$!

Joan, I am so glad you have the book "The Grammar of Point Ground" by Ulrike Voelcker.   If you do the IOLI Point Ground Journal, you will find using this book to improve the look of the point ground laces will be very helpful.  

I just took the Chantilly workshop at IOLI with Ulrike and the Magic Thread is used in MULTIPLE ways.   I am having FUN with gimp loops, they really work out so nicely with using the magic thread techniques that she has created to increase smooth, nice gimps without lots of ends showing.   Have fun using the book.   It will be your reference manual for all the point ground laces.    

Devon, I've heard for so many years about the magic thread, and never understood.  You wrote this almost 3 years ago, but it is a huge help!  Crystal clear.

Devon Thein said:

You take a thread, let's say about 8 inches long and knot it so it forms a loop. This is the magic thread. When you start, let us say, with several pairs hung rainbow fashion, around a pin and it is going to be a very tight area to do a sewing later, you put one end of your thread loop, the knotted end, on a helping pin a few inches away from the start pin and make sure the other end goes through the center of the  pairs you are starting. that end, too, is put on the helping pin that the other end of that thread loop is on. This is in no way attached to the actual lace, but just a knotted loop that goes through the start where the pin is.

So, you work the pairs you have hung on the starting pin as though there is no magic thread there. When you are ready to finish and you return to the beginning and need to hook into the infinitessimally small hole that is the center of where the pairs started, you remove the smooth end of the loop from the helping pin and you put one of the bobbins though it. Then you can use the loop to pull the bobbin thread through the start, sort of the way you would with a Lazy Susan. In this case, once the bobbin thread has looped throught the start and you pass the other bobbin of the pair through it, you can cut the magic thread because it has served its purpose.

I am not sure I have made this clear...sigh. It would make a great Youtube, wouldn't it?


Excellent explanation!  Very helpful!  Thank you so much! 
Carolyn Hastings said:

Devon, I've heard for so many years about the magic thread, and never understood.  You wrote this almost 3 years ago, but it is a huge help!  Crystal clear.

Devon Thein said:

You take a thread, let's say about 8 inches long and knot it so it forms a loop. This is the magic thread. When you start, let us say, with several pairs hung rainbow fashion, around a pin and it is going to be a very tight area to do a sewing later, you put one end of your thread loop, the knotted end, on a helping pin a few inches away from the start pin and make sure the other end goes through the center of the  pairs you are starting. that end, too, is put on the helping pin that the other end of that thread loop is on. This is in no way attached to the actual lace, but just a knotted loop that goes through the start where the pin is.

So, you work the pairs you have hung on the starting pin as though there is no magic thread there. When you are ready to finish and you return to the beginning and need to hook into the infinitessimally small hole that is the center of where the pairs started, you remove the smooth end of the loop from the helping pin and you put one of the bobbins though it. Then you can use the loop to pull the bobbin thread through the start, sort of the way you would with a Lazy Susan. In this case, once the bobbin thread has looped throught the start and you pass the other bobbin of the pair through it, you can cut the magic thread because it has served its purpose.

I am not sure I have made this clear...sigh. It would make a great Youtube, wouldn't it?

RSS

Translate This Site

Notes

HOW THE SOFTWARE WORKS

Created by Lorelei Halley Administrator Jan 19, 2012 at 7:07pm. Last updated by Lorelei Halley Administrator Dec 9, 2014.

PHOTOS

Created by Lorelei Halley Administrator Jan 19, 2012 at 7:29pm. Last updated by Lorelei Halley Administrator Sep 2, 2014.

How to Post a Long Article

Created by Lorelei Halley Administrator Mar 7, 2013 at 4:47pm. Last updated by Lorelei Halley Administrator Mar 7, 2013.

COMMUNITY GUIDELINES

Created by Lorelei Halley Administrator Jan 19, 2012 at 6:58pm. Last updated by Lorelei Halley Administrator Dec 20, 2012.

How to embed a video on the IOLI site

Created by Tatman Jan 25, 2012 at 3:26pm. Last updated by Lorelei Halley Administrator Jan 25, 2012.

Groups

Members

Badge

Loading…

Other Events

Laurie Waters has a very substantial EVENTS list on lacenews.

http://lacenews.net/lace-event-calendars/).   

EU Cookie Directive

© 2018   Created by Lorelei Halley Administrator.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service